From True Lent to True Vindication

 

“He told this next parable against those who trusted in their own righteous standing and despised others. 

“Two men,” he said. “went up to the Temple to pray. One was a Pharisee; the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed in this way to himself: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like the other people – greedy, unjust, immoral or even like this tax collector. I fast twice week; I give tithes of all that I get.’

 “But the tax collector stood a long way off and didn’t even want to raise his eyes to heaven. He beat his breast and said, ‘God be merciful to me, sinner that I am.’ Let me tell you, he was the one who went back to his house vindicated by God, not the other. Don’t you see? People who exalt themselves will be humbled, and people who humble themselves will be exalted.”  – Jesus, Luke’s Gospel record 18: 9-14

 

In this teaching Jesus wants us to see each man’s perspective about their righteous standing before God.

If you were in that audience that day you already knew that the Pharisees were those who sought to live out the letter of the law. They were good men who wanted to do what God asked of them. You would expect them to be given Jesus’ vindication for their ‘moral standing’.

If you were in that audience that day hearing this parable you also already knew what the tax-collector was up to – over charging tax collection. The Roman Empire would get their required share and the collector would pocket the overage. The audience would expect Jesus to denounce such a man who worked for the ‘enemy’ of God’s chosen people.

In the parable, one character felt justified, the other felt unworthy. The Pharisee, a good man by all the Law’s standards, uses moral relativism to present his case before the Ultimate Law Court Judge. It is and was easy, of course, to point out other’s moral failures to justify our own ‘moral standing’. You will always find someone who is lacking. You will always be able to play the ‘one-upmanship game’. The Pharisee felt he was on solid ground with his indictment of others.

The tax-collector was already in a deep, deep hole and knew it. He had nowhere to point but at himself.

It could be said that each character despised others in their own way. In their respective roles, each man looked down their nose at others, whether during tax-collecting or in approval collecting. I can see each of them wearing half-glasses perched on the tips of their noses and looking down in a presumptuous gaze. Yet, their trip to the Temple for each was viewed differently by Jesus.

The Pharisee said “Look over there!” The tax-collector said, “Don’t look over here!” In effect with this parable, Jesus said, “Look! Here is what I see!”

When the tax-collector lays bare his soul before God, we see the sacrifice of a broken and contrite spirit. This act of introspection in the presence of the Lord event is Lent – regaining perspective.

Now this is important. After Dr. Luke relates this parable, Luke goes on to tell us more about the eye-opening perspective required by Jesus in His kingdom:

 

Luke 18 v. 15-17: “I’m telling you the truth: anyone who doesn’t receive God’s kingdom like a child will never get into it.” What does a child see? He sees a good father. He sees someone safe and ready to put you on his knee close to him.

 

Luke 18 v. 18-27: In the days of Jesus many thought of wealth as a sign of God’s blessing. To the rich young ruler, who may have thought that he had a foot in the Kingdom gate because of his blessed circumstances, Jesus said “sell everything you own, and distribute it to the poor”. Jesus has no problem whatsoever with wealth or riches or with blessing people. Rather, Jesus wants us to be a conduit of wealth, riches and his blessing. For this rich man to change his worldview – positing his riches as a Kingdom Express Card – to looking at the Giver of a place in his Kingdom would require a change of perspective (and currency).* (BTW: this passage is not an ideological basis for redistribution of wealth as I heard a certain Jesuit imply. Rather, it is a particular instance where Jesus is realigning a man’s perspective. The rich man still had his free will to choose, whereas with socialism, choice is not an option.)

* ”When the rich young ruler heard Jesus’ reply he turned very sad; he was extremely wealthy.
Jesus saw that he had become sad, and said, “How hard it is for those with possessions to enter God’s Kingdom! Yes: it’s easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter God’s kingdom.”
The people who heard it said, “So, who can be saved?”
“What’s impossible for humans, “said Jesus, “is possible for God.”

Kingdom Perspective: Giving up what is treasured for the Kingdom is exactly what Jesus did for us when he emptied himself, took on a human form and went to the cross. Jesus makes the impossible possible for those who relinquish self and become conduits of his Living Water which contains the active ingredient Possible.

 

Luke 18 v. 28-30: With regard to how to view relationships, Jesus said, “…everyone who has left house or wife or brothers or parents or children, because of God’s kingdom, will receive far more in return in the present time—and in the age to come they will receive the life that belongs to that age.” Like with the Pharisee’s exculpatory plea bargain in the parable, you can’t say to the Lord, “But, my brother …”

 

Luke 18 v. 35-43:  A blind man cried out loudly, “Have pity on me!” and Jesus restored his sight. Jesus said, “Your faith has saved you.” Those who saw what had happened gave praise to God. This is not so much a passage about physical healing as it is much more about reminding those who think they see (e.g., the Pharisees in the parable) that they do not. To see by faith, as the blind man did, requires a major shift in one’s perspective.

 

From parable to reality…

 

Next, in Luke chapter 19, comes the account of Zacchaeus. Zacchaeus is a chief-tax collector whose physical stature was small and whose social stature was greatly diminished by his ‘overzealous’ tax collecting. Zacchaeus also gains new perspective — in a tree. Zacchaeus, like the tax-collector in the parable, also looks down. What did he see? Jesus looking up at him.

Lent is about gaining perspective, Kingdom perspective. During this time do I look at others and decide that I am good enough and need only just need a few tweaks here and there? Or, do I look to God and expose my very being to His Light?

There is tremendous gain when you take on Jesus’ perspective – your soul sees its worth in the eyes of Jesus.

A Rascally Witness

During this Lenten season each Sunday our church congregation repeats the Decalogue, The Ten Commandments:

 The First Commandment

 Rector: I am the Lord your God who brought you out of bondage. You shall have no other gods but me.

Congregation: Amen. Lord have mercy.

 

Last Sunday we had the privilege of hearing The Rev. Dr. Michael Lloyd, principal of Wycliffe Seminary in Oxford present a sermon on…

 Rector: You shall not steal.

Congregation: Amen. Lord have mercy.

 The Rev Dr. Lloyd reminded us that the original intent of this command was for God’s people not to steal other people (remember the story of Joseph?). Dr. Lloyd reminded us of the ongoing tragedy of human trafficking.

 

Tomorrow:

Rector: You shall not be a false witness.

Congregation: Amen. Lord have mercy.

 

The book of Proverbs has some interesting observations about truth telling…:

What are worthless and wicked people like? They are constant liars
Prov. 6:12

17 When you tell the truth, justice is done, but lies lead to injustice. 20 Those who plan evil are in for a rude surprise, but those who work for good will find happiness. 22 The Lord hates liars, but is pleased with those who keep their word.
Prov. 12

A rascally witness makes a mockery of justice, and the mouth of the wicked spreads iniquity.
Prov. 19:28

A false accusation is as deadly as a sword, a club, or a sharp arrow. (emphasis mine)
Prov. 25:18

 …and so does history:

 

The following quote has major implications for our present political discourse:

“In my study of communist societies, I came to the conclusion that the purpose of communist propaganda was not to persuade or convince, not to inform, but to humiliate; and therefore, the less it corresponded to reality the better. When people are forced to remain silent when they are being told the most obvious lies, or even worse when they are forced to repeat the lies themselves, they lose once and for all their sense of probity. To assent to obvious lies is…in some small way to become evil oneself. One’s standing to resist anything is thus eroded, and even destroyed. A society of emasculated liars is easy to control. I think if you examine political correctness, it has the same effect and is intended to.”
― Theodore Dalrymple (emphasis mine)

 

Note how lying and political correctness go hand in hand?

 

Speaking of a “rascally witness“, below is a response to the obvious lies and character assassination of the Koch Brothers spoken by Senator Harry Reid on the Senate floor, from a recent WSJ op-ed:

 

Charles Koch: I’m Fighting to Restore a Free Society

Instead of welcoming free debate, collectivists engage in character assassination.

Ash Wednesday, 2011

2011. Last night I received the external mark of penitence with the imposition of ashes: the sign of the cross placed on my forehead. I was reminded:  “Dust you are and to dust you shall return” (Genesis 3:19).

After the imposition of the ashes our congregation knelt and we confessed sin.  The rector then spoke over us forgiveness and absolution from sin. We then celebrated the Great Feast of Thanksgiving. I received the Eucharist and returned to my seat.

While others in the congregation went forward to receive the Eucharist, the choir and congregation sang hymns and choruses. It was during this time that the organ began to play “Just As I Am”.  Immediately I recalled the Greater Chicago Billy Graham Crusade I had attended in 1971.

The Crusade took place in Chicago’s huge convention center, McCormick Place.  The convention center at that time was the largest indoor arena in the United States.  Over 18,000 people gathered for the event held during May & June of 1971.

With other members of my church, I attended the crusade as a counselor.  This crusade was an event I will never forget:  massive crowds of people, thousands of voices singing, Cliff Barrows leading songs, George Beverly Shea singing solos, the Crusade Choir singing How Great Thou Art and of course, the preaching of Billy Graham. At seventeen years old, I was awe struck. I had never seen so many people come together for Christ.  It was foretaste of heaven for me.

Around that time, many of my friends and I were involved in the Jesus People movement in the Chicago area.  Our simple message during the crusade: “One Way” and “Tell Billy Graham: ‘The Jesus People love him.”

At the end of Billy’s message, an invitation was given to come forward.  The choir began to sing Just As I Am.  Hundreds of people then came forward to receive the Lord into their hearts. There were people of all races and walks of life. Billy would say to the crowd, “The ground is level at the foot of the cross.”

As one of many prayer counselors, I talked and prayed with those who came forward to receive Christ. Many decisions for Christ were made that day. Many lives were forever changed that day.  I was changed by the power of the Gospel.

The Good News of Jesus Christ, “the Jesus Revolution”, is at work in me now, just as I am – dust.

Just as I am, without one plea, 
but that thy blood was shed for me, 
and that thou bidst me come to thee, 
O Lamb of God, I come, I come. 
 
Just as I am, and waiting not 
to rid my soul of one dark blot, 
to thee whose blood can cleanse each spot, 
O Lamb of God, I come, I come. 
 
Just as I am, though tossed about 
with many a conflict, many a doubt, 
fightings and fears within, without, 
O Lamb of God, I come, I come. 
 
Just as I am, poor, wretched, blind; 
sight, riches, healing of the mind, 
yea, all I need in thee to find, 
O Lamb of God, I come, I come. 
 
Just as I am, thou wilt receive, 
wilt welcome, pardon, cleanse, relieve; 
because thy promise I believe, 
O Lamb of God, I come, I come. 

Just as I am, thy love unknown 
hath broken every barrier down; 
now, to be thine, yea thine alone, 
O Lamb of God, I come, I come. 

- Charlotte Elliott

The Imprint of Prudence

During the 2010 Lenten season, I studied Josef Pieper’s book The Four Cardinal Virtues. I specifically meditated on the first two virtues: Prudence and Justice.

During the 2011 Lenten season, I will meditate on the virtues of Fortitude and Temperance.

Quotes from Josef Pieper’s The Four Cardinal Virtues:

The First of the Cardinal Virtues…

Prudence:
“No dictum in traditional Christian doctrine strikes such a note of strangeness to the ears of contemporaries, even contemporary Christians, as this one: the virtue of prudence is the mold and “mother” of all the other cardinal virtues, of justice, fortitude, and temperance. In other words, none but the prudent man can be just, brave, and temperate, and the good man is good in so far as he is prudent.”

“To the contemporary mind, then, the concept of the good rather excludes than includes prudence. Modern man cannot conceive of a good act which might not be imprudent, nor of a bad act which might not be prudent. He will often call lies and cowardice prudent, truthfulness and courageous sacrifice imprudent.”

“Prudence is the “measure” of justice, of fortitude, of temperance. This means simply the following: as in the creative cognition of God all created things are pre-imaged and pre-formed; as, therefore, the immanent essences of all reality dwell in God as ‘ideas”, as “preceding images” …; and as man’s perception of realty is a receptive transcript of the objective world of being; and as the artist’s works are transcripts of a living prototype already within his creative cognition – so the decree of prudence is the prototype and the pre-existing form of which all ethically good action is the transcript.”

“Prudence “informs” the other virtues; it confers on them the form of their inner essence…And so prudence imprints the inward seal of goodness upon all free activity of man.”

“The intrinsic goodness of man – and that is the same as saying his true humanness – consists in this, that “reason perfected in cognition of truth” shall inwardly shape and imprint his volition and action.”

“Certainly prudence is the standard of volition and action; but the standard of prudence, on the other hand, is the ipsa res, the “thing itself”, the objective reality of being. And therefore the pre-eminence of prudence signifies first of all the direction of volition and action toward truth; but finally it signifies the directing of volition and action toward objective reality. The good is prudent beforehand; but that is prudent which is in keeping with reality.”